Ancient Rome Refocused podcast

Interview with Andrew Hulse

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Bonus Material Episode 26 (S5) Bonus Material 1, Episode 26 (S5) Andrew Hulse, producer of Helicon Theatrical Productions, discusses the scholar of epic poetry, Milman Perry, and his associate Albert Lord. Hulse promotes Lord's book The Singer of Tales as a "wacky and mind bending…" experience. Albert Bates Lord was a professor of Slavic and comparative literature at Harvard University who, after the death of Milman Parry, carried on that scholar's research into epic literature. Wikipedia The Singer of Tales is a book by Albert Lord that discusses the oral tradition as a theory of literary composition and its applications to Homeric and medieval epic. It was published in 1960. Wikipedia

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