Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

Donna Hamlin, an executive coach on how to be a better leader in neurotech

0:00
38:08
15 Sekunden vorwärts
15 Sekunden vorwärts

Dr. Donna Hamlin is a corporate executive with thirty years of corporate, governance and strategy consulting experience. She oversees BoardWise’s global programs, including its centers and their services. These include: board evaluations, professional certification and training, its global registry of qualified directors, Board Bona Fide®, its strategic partnership programs and its Boardwise center. 

Top 3 Takeaways

  •  "It's really important to know that if we want to be good at our work, then we've got to explore things outside of our normal swim lanes. And when we do that, it gives us a different view or another way"
  • "There's a great exercise called appreciating your vices. If you can identify vices, and then you can go teach some group of people, how to do that vice really well. Then you start laughing at it because you realize how silly it is."
  • "360 is when an executive coach hand picks five to six people that work with that person routinely and you do an in-depth interview about the experience of working with this person. And then you summarize all of that into some themes and sit down with the person to say what we can do to make you a stronger leader as a result of that. And typically in that process, you're getting raw feedback about what that experience is through a third party."

0:30 "How would you describe yourself?"

6:00 "Why creativity? Why leadership? How are those two things connected?"

10:00 "How should one think about approaching being a good leader or being the ideal leader? "

11:30 "Are you limited to a specific type of job based on your predisposition?"

14:15 "You mentioned five different types of, I guess leadership styles. Do you want to go through these and explain what each of them are a little bit?"

21:00 "What are some big mistakes or what's the biggest issue that you see with leaders?"

24:30 "Is there any other exercises that we can do in order to strengthen those muscles of listening more?"

30:00 "Do you have any other more stories how this 360 or this kind of social gaps were changed or improved by having some sort of an outside perspective?"

32:15 "Do you want to talk about your company? What do you do?"

34:30 "Do you have any stories of the most radical transformation?"

37:45 " Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"

 

Weitere Episoden von „Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions“

  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Francois Ladouceur on a new paradigm for action potential sensing through optics

    28:13

    Francois Ladouceur is a University of New South Wales professor teaching and researching integrated optics, silica and diamond-based photonics, optical sensing networks, and photonics-based brain/machine interfaces Top 3 Takeaways:  "it's a liquid crystal-based transducer that can transduce an electrical signal into an optical signal that we can carry the away from the place of measurement" With electrical-based electrodes making the devices smaller increases the impedance degrading the signal which doesn't happen in LCP based electrodes "We have built a chip, which is bidirectional, it can read the action potential and it can stimulate the neuron. Again, entirely passive. It requires no electrical input. It does not dissipate energy." 0:30 "How did you get on this podcast?" 3:00 Is another advantage the lack of heat generated? 5:30 "What are the bio compatible properties of liquid crystal?" 7:00 "What are some advantages of this over other techniques?" 10:15 "How does the multiplexer work?" 15:15 "What would be the minimum width?" 19:00 "You haven't really published too much about this, but you said a big paper is going to be coming out?" 21:30 "It's really just for sensing, you couldn't stimulate with these, right?" 25:00 "When did this technology originally come to your mind?" 27:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Sergey Young on lifespan and health span extension through his Longevity Fund

    19:25

    Sergey Young is a longevity investor and visionary with a mission to extend healthy lifespans of at least one billion people. To do that, Sergey founded Longevity Vision Fund to accelerate life extension technological breakthroughs and to make longevity affordable and accessible to all Top 3 Takeaways:  "I'm sponsoring the development of age reversal X price. This is a technological competition to basically reverse aging measured by a set of biomarkers." "Some of the companies that we have in our portfolio decrease the cost of a particular healthcare intervention or solution to a particular health problem by a factor of 10, 20, even 50." Longevity investing is very collaborative, even if investors lose money they still feel like they helped the world. 0:45 "Do you wanna describe yourself?" 2:00 "So why, especially longevity?" 5:00 "What are you looking for when a company comes to you?" 9:30 "How do you measure success in a fund?" 11:30 "What does it take to raise a new fund and to get more money in order for you to invest?" 16:00 "Is there anything that we didn't cover that you wanted to mention? Maybe you want to talk about your book a little bit?"  
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Verpasse keine Episode von Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions und abonniere ihn in der kostenlosen GetPodcast App.

    iOS buttonAndroid button
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Miguel Nicolelis on Neuralink and performing in front of a billion people at the 2014 World Cup

    33:31

    Although the Nicolelis Laboratory is best known for pioneering studies in neuronal population coding, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMI) and neuroprosthetics in human patients and non-human primates, they have also developed an integrative approach to studying neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinsons disease and epilepsy. Top 3 Takeaways: "Every Brazilian kid dreams to play for the Brazilian national team in a world cup game, I didn't quite fulfill the dream, but I got as close as a scientist can get. And we had about 65,000 people in the stadium that day in about 1.2 billion people watching the kickoff." "Every time one of my students complain about the programming job, I said, are you kidding me? You have one megabyte of Ram. We had 64 K. No complaining anymore." Instead of selling a device they will be opening neuro rehab centers in under developed areas of the world to give better treatment than what could be possible at the largest hospitals 2:15 "Do you want to introduce yourself a little bit beyond [doing the FIFA 2014 kickoff]?" 6:00 "So what's the advantage of monkey versus rat versus pig. All these different animal models versus human?" 8:45 Why did the monkey implants last longer? 10:30 "I want to go into this hardware that you've used, you made your own, it sounds like you made your own probes and then I'm imagining, computers from the late nineties too. So were you limited by that?" 15:45 "Is it easier now with more RAM, better computation? We have a million times more, but is it a million times easier or how does that translate?" 18:30 "Neuralink had this really interesting presentation with the monkey playing pong, but probably for you that wasn't nearly as innovative. Do you want to talk about this a little bit?" 23:15 "You were going to choose to become an Ameritas at Duke and that you're sitting, setting up an Institute in Brazil. Do you want to talk about both of these?" 28:45 "Obviously you have ties to Brazil, but is there any other advantages to having it in Brazil versus Europe or us or Australia?" 29:30 "What's the next place? Where should we be looking forward to these hubs?" 33:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Kip Ludwig on some of the more controversial neurotech ideas

    39:01

    Dr. Ludwig leads the Bioelectronic Medicines Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, with the goal of developing next-generation neuromodulation therapies that use minimally invasive strategies to highjack the nervous system to treat circuit dysfunction and deliver biomolecules to target areas with unprecedented precision. Prior to Wisconsin, Dr. Ludwig served as the Program Director for Neural Engineering at the National Institutes of Health. He co-led the Translational Devices Program at NINDS, led the NIH BRAIN Initiative programs to catalyze implantable academic and clinical devices to stimulate and/or record from the central nervous system, and led a trans-NIH planning team in developing the ~250 million dollar S.P.A.R.C. Program to stimulate advances in neuromodulation therapies for organ systems. Dr. Ludwig also worked in Industry as a research scientist, where his team conceived, developed, and demonstrated the chronic efficacy of a next-generation neural stimulation electrode for reducing blood pressure in both pre-clinical studies and clinical trials. Through his industry work, he oversaw Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) and non-GLP studies enabling clinical trials in Europe and the United States, as well as participated in the protocol development and execution of those trials, leading to approval for sale in seven countries and a U.S. Pivotal trial. Top 3 Takeaways "We actually don't definitively know what we're stimulating for effects in most of our largest markets for neuromodulation therapy. "Don't ever date electrical stimulation. It will cheat on you. It's very promiscuous. It also creates a lot of effects in non-neuronal cells. That may be important... electrical stimulation is very dirty. There's no way around it" "A lot of things we don't consider as one of the startup company fails. Now we've got a piece of hardware in my neck and I've got nobody who knows how to maintain it." 1:00 "Do you wanna introduce yourself?" 2:00 You've been in academia, industry, and government, what's that like? 5:00 "Before we started recording, you were talking about, drug-resistant drug coatings on neural devices. Why might not that be a good one?" 12:30 "Everybody uses rat models, but that might not be very accurate because humans and rats are different, right?" 15:00 "So what's the solution? Use more human testing?" 18:30 "What's the solution. How did people gain this perspective?" 22:45 "Is this something that we need to wait for AI to be able to solve?" 26:45 "But is that bad? So for me, I'm more engineering-minded, more practical. It's just if it works, it works, right?" 33:45 "The small percentage that makes it through the phase one and I wonder how many, good therapies were out there that just because of chance, fell through.?" 37:15 "So we have to redo statistics, is that what you're saying?" 37:45 " Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Justin Sanchez on going from working at DARPA to helping roll out tech at Battelle

    40:00

    Dr Justin Sanchez is a Life Sciences Research Technical Fellow at Battelle but before that he was Director of Biological Technologies office at DARPA. Top 3 Takeaways "You'll never be able to establish your academic career unless you go and move to another place. I'm like, guys, this doesn't make any sense to me. What's most important is to do great work in the field and establish a foundation of the field." "I still had my university job for a couple of years while I was serving at DARPA. And if my time at DARPA and everybody's term-limited at DARPA. When that term ended, I could have gone back to Miami." "I launched three gigantic programs in neurotechnology each one with 70 or $80 million behind them and found some of the best teams in the world to do that." 1:15 "Do you want to maybe start at the beginning and talk a little bit about your work here in Gainesville?" 10:00 "So on the show and when we're talking about to the other DARPA directors we talk about the moment you got tapped on the shoulder, is that when you were tapped on the shoulder to go serve?" 16:15 "I think of DARPA, as...seemingly throw unlimited resources at, projects to solve them. But it's very time-limited and it can stop at a moment's notice. So it's almost a little bit like cocaine research... So what was that like? And what was the day-to-day or  how was that different than being a professor researcher?" 19:45 "So what was your day-to-day like?" 23:30 "Afterwards... you went to go work at Battelle. Do you want to talk about this?" 27:45 "Your official role [at Battelle] is Life Sciences Research, Technical Fellow. I don't know what that means. What do you do?" 32:00 "So what are some maybe specific projects that are exciting you nowadays? " 36:00 "You wrote a book about all this. I'm very curious about it. Do you want to talk about this a little bit?" 39:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Victor Pikov on starting a bioelectronic medicine company after working at Galvani

    35:43

    Dr Victor Pikov is the founder and CEO of Medipace, a sacral nerve stimulation neuromodulation company and VP of Technology at TRI, Trans Stimulation Incorporated. He also worked at Galvani, a joint venture between Google and GSK as well as working in academia before.  Top 3 Takeaways "When you try to speak to potential investors who consider themselves experts in medical devices, they typically fall into three categories: One is no experience with neuromodulation and another bucket is experienced with wearable neuromodulation. And the third very small bucket is experience with implantable class three neuromodulation." "Chinese VCs, typically are much younger, often they're less than 30 years old. And they're joining typically in larger numbers, about four to six to the zoom meetings versus one to two in the US and they're also being rather silent during the presentations." " [A surgeon] showed a whole bunch of photographs of failed implantations and you could see all kinds of ways it possibly can fail. This is very educational. It's much better than showing a picture of a working implant." 0:45 "Do you want to introduce yourself?" 1:15 "You were working at Galvani... do you want to explain it and what the, what this venture was aiming?" 8:00 "So you were there for three years and then you decided to go do your own thing, did you see a need in the market?" 12:15 "Let's talk about these NIH, SBR grants" 19:00 "You were pitching to VCs in China. And so now you have a comparison, the US versus China. So what's that like?" 21:00 "A lot of people are a little bit nervous about working with China or Chinese companies because of intellectual property. They're worried that their technology will be stolen or copied. Is that something that people should be worried about? Is that how did you approach it?" 25:15 You guys decided to use an off-the-shelf IPG instead of developing your own one, why? 30:45 Can you talk about the small neurotech meetings you organized? 34:15 "So you're saying as an academician, you had lots of time, but now you don't." 35:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"   Here is the link to 5 conferences that Dr Pikov helped to organize: https://neuroprostheticdevicesconferences.wordpress.com/
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Daniel Palanker on breaking physics to found neurotech companies

    33:26

    Dr Daniel Palanker is Professor of Opthamology at Stanford University. He has had many successful technologies spun off into companies or patents including those involving retinal prosthetics, optical imaging and spectroscopy, laser-tissue interactions, and retinal plasticity. Top 3 Takeaways "The [size] limitation for a retinal prosthesis is not in a fabrication side. The limitation is an interface with neurons" Allergan acquired Oculeve but then didn't do much with it seemingly because they already had a more profitable drug on the market "Stanford is industry-friendly, encouraging commercialization, basically making things practical and useful and in Berkeley it's a communist mentality" 1:15 "You've worked on a railroad. Do you want to talk about this a little bit?" 2:00 "I introduced you a little bit, but do you want to describe yourself and your role?" 3:00 "The retinal prosthesis is a very fascinating technology. What's the advantage of this versus something else?" 7:15 "Tell me about the progress of this technology. Where did it start and how far has it progressed in the many years since you've been working on it" 14:00 "It seems there's a curse, on these vision prosthetics companies and the SecondSight and actually Pixium also has stuttered a little bit in the last year or so. Do you want to comment?" 19:30 "You mentioned this sub 40 micron photo detector, do you see a potential for, getting down to the five and the three micron size of that you had mentioned?" 22:45 "Did you want to talk about TrueTear and Oculeve a little bit?" 24:00 "If you suspect [a company buying your tech and shelving it] were to happen the then would you would you go through with that sale or would you continue to develop it yourself?" 25:15 "I was reading you have 70 patents and seven platform technologies... Is this a Stanford thing? Do you have access to great talent or are the projects you're working on especially good at spinning off these companies?" 27:15 "Is there anything else that you're excited about? Any other crazy physics rules that you're gonna be breaking?" 33:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Donna Hamlin, an executive coach on how to be a better leader in neurotech

    38:08

    Dr. Donna Hamlin is a corporate executive with thirty years of corporate, governance and strategy consulting experience. She oversees BoardWise’s global programs, including its centers and their services. These include: board evaluations, professional certification and training, its global registry of qualified directors, Board Bona Fide®, its strategic partnership programs and its Boardwise center.  Top 3 Takeaways  "It's really important to know that if we want to be good at our work, then we've got to explore things outside of our normal swim lanes. And when we do that, it gives us a different view or another way" "There's a great exercise called appreciating your vices. If you can identify vices, and then you can go teach some group of people, how to do that vice really well. Then you start laughing at it because you realize how silly it is." "360 is when an executive coach hand picks five to six people that work with that person routinely and you do an in-depth interview about the experience of working with this person. And then you summarize all of that into some themes and sit down with the person to say what we can do to make you a stronger leader as a result of that. And typically in that process, you're getting raw feedback about what that experience is through a third party." 0:30 "How would you describe yourself?" 6:00 "Why creativity? Why leadership? How are those two things connected?" 10:00 "How should one think about approaching being a good leader or being the ideal leader? " 11:30 "Are you limited to a specific type of job based on your predisposition?" 14:15 "You mentioned five different types of, I guess leadership styles. Do you want to go through these and explain what each of them are a little bit?" 21:00 "What are some big mistakes or what's the biggest issue that you see with leaders?" 24:30 "Is there any other exercises that we can do in order to strengthen those muscles of listening more?" 30:00 "Do you have any other more stories how this 360 or this kind of social gaps were changed or improved by having some sort of an outside perspective?" 32:15 "Do you want to talk about your company? What do you do?" 34:30 "Do you have any stories of the most radical transformation?" 37:45 " Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    David McMullen of NIH on Blueprint Medtech, the program to help neurotech companies grow

    27:14

    David McMullen is the program officer at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in the National Institutes of Health (NIH). They are launching the NIH Blueprint Medtech (links below) which aims to help incubate growing neurotech companies go from Bench to Bedside.    Top 3 Takeaways  "We're funding individual projects and trying to help groups in the past have struggled... to get funding and to get all the way to in human trials. The Blueprint Medtech resource is meant to derisk later investment and grants for companies "We saw some great programs... having difficulty when they come in - Can we decrease the activation energy to getting to first-in-human? Can we compress the timeline a little bit Can we spend that money a little bit more wisely and improve some of these outcomes?" 0:45 "Do you want to introduce yourself?" 5:45 "Do you want to describe your job? What do you do and what is the program director do?" 7:45 "Do you want to talk about the Blueprint Initiative?" 9:45 "This sounds almost like a government-led VC, am I off in this?"  11:00 "Do you want to describe the project a little bit?" 13:30 What are some guidelines of the project to fund neurotech companies? 16:30 "Generally, what stage should the company be at?" 18:15 "How do the hubs work? When I think of a hub, I think of a physical, like one location but does it have to be like that?" 23:45 "Do you want to talk a little bit about the motivation for this?" 26:30 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"   NIH BLUEPRINT MEDTECH LINKS https://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/neurotherapeutics/blueprint-medtech/blueprint-medtech -Home website for the Blueprint MedTech program. Overall figure explaining the program on the front page. The site links to the webinars and funding opportunities. Blueprint-MedTech@NIH.gov Please reach out if you have any questions!   INDIVIDUAL PROJECT FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES: October 20, 2021 First receipt date. Multiple receipt dates. https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-21-315.html Blueprint MedTech Translator (UG3/UH3 - Clinical Trial Optional) https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-21-282.html Funding Opportunity TitleBlueprint Medtech: Small Business Translator (U44 - Clinical Trial Optional)   INCUBATOR HUBS: Only 1 receipt date! October 20, 2021 https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-21-314.html Blueprint MedTech: Incubator Hubs (U54 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)   WEBINARS: Incubator Hub Funding Opportunity (PAR-21-314) Monday, August 30, 2021, 3:00 PM EDT https://nih.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItduqhqTgvHK78uuoSkwWMy8Fxerkorrk Translator Funding Opportunities (PAR-21-315; PAR-21-282) Tuesday, August 31, 2021 4:00 PM EDT https://nih.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItdeGgqjoiHfRfjhhV11eGmkgbXiiRwPM   Blueprint-MedTech@NIH.gov
  • Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions podcast

    Jon Speer on how Quality Management Software for Medtech companies raised $120 Million

    26:27

    Jon is the founder of Greenlight Guru (quality management software exclusively for medical device companies) & a medical device guru with nearly 20 years industry experience. Jon knows the best medical device companies in the world use quality as an accelerator. That's why he created Greenlight Guru to help companies move beyond compliance to True Quality.   Top 3 Takeaways If it isn't documented, it didn't happen. One particular audit didn't take four days. It took two days because the Greenlight system made it so much simpler. Greenlight Guru also has an academy to teach people about the medical device regulatory process.   0:45 "What is quality management and why is it important? And it doesn't have to be boring?" 4:15 "Why couldn't people just make their own system?" 7:00 "Is the process any different for neurotech or neural implants or is this pretty applicable to all medical devices?" 8:00 "Is this something that is applicable to... people in government or academia or anybody else?" 11:00 "What are exactly the tangible benefits of using GreenLight Guru?" 16:00 "You guys got a nice investment recently, $120 million. I'm surprised. Why so much? And what's it gonna be used for?" 20:00 "I want to hear a little bit more about the academy."  

Hol dir die ganze Welt der Podcasts mit der kostenlosen GetPodcast App.

Abonniere alle deine Lieblingspodcasts, höre Episoden auch offline und erhalte passende Empfehlungen für Podcasts, die dich wirklich interessieren.

iOS buttonAndroid button
© radio.de GmbH 2021radio.net logo