Glow Journal podcast

Glow Journal

Gemma Watts

Join beauty writer Gemma Watts in conversation with the world’s biggest beauty pioneers. We’re picking the brains behind the beauty products that fill your bathroom cupboards- the CEOs, founders and creative minds heading the brands that shape the beauty industry. From cult favourites to the products you reach for every day, from young entrepreneurs to companies steeped in history, these are the stories behind the most successful beauty businesses on the planet.

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108 Episoden

  • Glow Journal podcast

    Pia Whitesell | Founder of Macabalm

    47:02

    In episode eighty of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder of Macabalm, Pia Whitesell.Pia’s first memories of beauty centre around strength, rather than aesthetics. Raised by her mother, grandmother and, as she tells me, really her entire community, Pia grew up identifying beauty with strength and getting it done- an ethos she’s taken into her own adult life. Another ethos that has taken Pia from her teens right through to now is this idea of natural beauty, and an understanding that your beauty lies within the things that make you uniquely you. Despite winning the now infamous Dolly Magazine Model Search at the age of 14, Pia tells me that she grew up feeling different, as a Latina going to both school and castings with girls who didn’t share her body shape nor the colour of her skin, her eyes and her hair. Her modelling career saw her walking in fashion shows with the likes Helena Christensen and Linda Evangelista, and it was at this point, the height of the 90s, that she began to appreciate the aesthetic of the time- pared back, natural beauty. As a model, an actress and a mother, Pia had identified a gap for a true beauty multitasker, and as she began researching native Australian ingredients she came across the humble macadamia, the benefits of which you’ll hear more about in our conversation- and so, Macabalm was born. A mere 12 months following the brand’s launch in Australia, Pia is already working on the brand’s US launch. In this conversation, Pia shares the lessons she has learnt around the comparison trap and why she’s passing those lessons on to her teenaged sons, the challenges she’s faced as a brand launching with a single SKU, and how a pest controller could have undone the years of work she put into gaining Macabalm’s organic certification. Read more at glowjournal.comFollow Macabalm on Instagram @macabalmStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    BONUS | What Do These Trending Skincare Ingredients Actually Do?

    26:30

    In this special bonus Ask An Expert episode, host Gemma Watts is joined by pharmacist and Medical Communications Manager at L’Oréal Australia, Rachel McAdam. Rachel’s role sees her provide L’Oréal brands with insight into consumer skin health needs from a pharmacy perspective, so I thought she would be the perfect person to answer the questions YOU submitted on the skincare and ingredient trends you’re seeing more of. I’m so often asked really specific questions about the skin (and, in this case, about ingredients and industry trends), but given that I’m an educated consumer and not an expert, I insist on taking those questions to those who can correctly and ethically answer them for you. In the name of transparency this episode is sponsored by CeraVe, however as per all of my expert interviews, the goal is not to sell you something specific. For this reason, you’ll hear Rachel recommend ingredients, rather than brands, and offer more general advice, giving you the tools you need to make your own, educated purchasing decisions. In this episode, Rachel answers your questions on skincare trends- from which products are actually necessary in a healthy skincare routine and what percentages of trending active ingredients are actually going to make a difference to the skin, through to the rise of trends like “singular ingredient” serums and “skinimalism,”- and whether or not those trends are worth engaging with. You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.comFollow CeraVe on Instagram @cerave_aDiscover more at cerave.com.auStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

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    Emily Parr | Founder of HoliFrog

    1:14:27

    In episode seventy nine of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder of HoliFrog, Emily Parr.Emily Parr’s career in beauty began when her career in the wellness space saw her headhunted by Salma Hayek.Having worked in fashion and health PR respectively, Salma Hayek’s brand was Emily’s first beauty client. This led Emily to found Poke PR in late 2012, an agency that would go on to both represent and grow the likes of Drunk Elephant and Glow Journal’s friends The Beauty Chef, Summer Fridays and Briogeo- all of which were brands that Emily cold-emailed and pitched to herself. Emily garnered a reputation for being the industry’s champion of female-founded, founder-led, clean beauty brands, and is largely responsible for the narrative shift beauty media made away from the term “natural” and replaced with the word “clean.” It was in 2018 that a chance encounter at an industry function saw Emily meet the man who would later become her HoliFrog co-founder, with HoliFrog soon becoming the go-to brand for a product many cosmetic formulators had dubbed “the beauty industry’s afterthought”- cleanser. What did begin as a line of facial cleansers has since expanded to serums and a moisturiser, with 4 new launches hitting shelves in the next 12 months. In this conversation, Emily shares the art of the cold email, some truly interesting points on media’s shift to digital and what that means for the beauty industry, and the importance of knowing the difference between telling a brand’s story vs. sharing a selling point.Read more at glowjournal.comFollow HoliFrog on Instagram @holifrogStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    BONUS | Your Laser and IPL Questions Answered

    27:31

    Are laser and IPL different, and which is better? Can I still get laser hair removal in the summer? What does laser actually do to pigmentation? Are laser spider vein treatments permanent?In this Ask An Expert episode, host Gemma Watts is joined by National Clinical Operations Manager for Candela Medical ANZ, Kirsten Cachia. Professional skin clinics are finally back open and the festive season is almost upon us, so we’ve received an influx of questions recently regarding skin treatments for everything from hair removal and skin tightening through to pigmentation and spider veins. This bonus episode is sponsored by Candela Medical, however Kirsten is not here to push specific products, treatments or brands. As per the rest of this Ask An Expert Series, I’ve sought qualified experts to give you objective answers to your questions so that you can take that information and make your own educated decisions regarding which treatments are right for you. In this episode, we’ve taken the questions YOU submitted on all things laser and IPL to Kirsten- from the real difference between laser and IPL and if it’s even worth undergoing a hair removal treatment so close to summer through to what’s involved in pigmentation and spider vein treatmments and whether or not laser treatments are really permanent. You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.com/laser-and-ipl-basicsFollow Candela Medical on Instagram @candelamedicalanzDiscover more at candelamedia.comStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    Natalie Plain | Founder and CEO of Billion Dollar Brows

    36:00

    In episode seventy eight of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder and CEO of Billion Dollar Brows, Natalie Plain.In the year 2003, standalone brow brands were few and far between. It was in that year, however, that Natalie Plain watched as lash products dominated the beauty market and noticed a gap for dedicated brow products. Natalie had long held an understanding of the role brows play in the overall beauty picture. Having naturally bushy brows as a child, a teenage Natalie had begged her mother to take her to Beverly Hills to have them professionally shaped. The results, she tells me, were transformative- on her confidence above anything else.  By 2003 Natalie had been a White House intern and was working as a journalist, and upon noticing that the lash market was exploding yet so few people were developing products for the brows, despite them being mere millimetres away, she decided it was she who could fill that white space- and so, Billion Dollar Brows was born.What began as a single SKU has since grown to a full colour cosmetics line and, today, Billion Dollar Brows is available in 32 countries. In this conversation, Natalie shares the importance of focus groups, why an early understanding of Google Ad Words played a key role in her brand’s launch, and her advice on dealing with emerging competitors when you’re first to market. Read more at glowjournal.comFollow Billion Dollar Brows on Instagram @billiondollarbrowsStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    BONUS | Your Wedding Skin Questions Answered

    23:31

    How far out from your wedding day should you start your skin prep? What should you be doing for your skin a year, six months, and a week before your wedding? What do you do if a pimple or irritation arises on your wedding day? What’s the biggest mistake brides-to-be make the night before their big day?In this Ask An Expert episode, host Gemma Watts is joined by Dermal Clinician and founder of Victorian Dermal Group, Derya Koch. Events are, at long last, on the horizon again, and skin clinics have finally reopened their doors, so we have received an overwhelming number of questions from brides-to-be asking how best to prepare their skin ahead of their wedding day.This Ask An Expert episode is sponsored by Candela Medical, however Derya is not here to push specific brands and products. As per the rest of this Ask An Expert Series, I’ve sought qualified experts to give you objective answers to your questions so that you can take that information and make your own educated decisions regarding which treatments are right for you. In this episode, we’ve taken the questions YOU submitted on wedding skin to Derya- from exactly what you should be doing a year, six months, and a week before your wedding day and how late is too late to start those preparations in order to see results, through to what to do if a pimple or an irritation flares up on your big day and the DIY treatments you should absolutely avoid the night before your wedding. You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.com/wedding-skin-prepFollow Candela Medical on Instagram @candelamedicalanzDiscover more at candelamedia.comStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    Michèle Evrard | Founder and CEO of Cosmetics 27

    1:03:36

    In episode seventy seven of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder of Cosmetics 27, Michèle Evrard. Michèle grew up with more of a love for the outdoors than a love for beauty- although, in a sense, it was the former that brought her to the latter. Michèle’s love of the outdoors led to a desire to be an adventurer- an archeologist, specifically, as she tells me one of her earliest wishes was “to discover something.” She found herself naturally drawn to science, completing her studies at medicine and pharmacy schools before taking a job within the beauty industry and discovering a passion for product development.What led to the development of Cosmetics 27, however, was something different entirely. That aforementioned love of the outdoors saw Michèle injure herself skiing, and amidst her search to find a product to heal the subsequent scar, she was introduced to a plant with regenerative properties that had, at the time, not been used to even a tenth of its potential. That plant became the base of her first product, the now-cult Baume 27, fulfilling her desire for discovery and fascination with creation, and despite having no initial plans to bring the product to market, it now sits at the core of the Cosmetics 27 brand. I have long used and loved the Cosmetics 27 brand, but what I found to be just as remarkable as the products was Michèle’s willingness to acknowledge and reflect on decisions that she deems to be failures, as well as the way in which she talks about independent brands and multinationals coexisting in the beauty space, with each brand (and, more importantly, each idea) pushing those around them to do better. In this conversation, Michèle shares how social media trends might be affecting our skin’s balance, the ways in which the barrier to entry to the beauty industry has been lowered, and why remaining an independent brand is both freeing and a hurdle. Read more at glowjournal.comFollow Cosmetics 27 on Instagram @cosmetics27Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    Lisa and Lauren Goldfaden | Co-Founders of Goldfaden MD

    51:22

    In episode seventy six of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the co-founders of Goldfaden MD, Lisa Goldfaden and Lauren Wolk-Goldfaden. Despite officially launching in 2013, Goldfaden MD technically begun in Dr Gary Goldfaden’s dermatology practice about 40 years ago. Lisa, his daughter, spent the early part of her working life in arts and education, while Lauren, his daughter-in-law, spent hers working on ad campaigns for the likes of Coca Cola, Voltswagen and Burger King. While both had an interest in beauty and understanding of the “clean” movement that was beginning to build momentum, it wasn’t until friends of the family started asking for access to Dr Goldfaden’s clinical formulas that Lisa and Lauren realised they had family ties to a brand worth developing. Goldfaden MD was the very first brand to bridge the gap between “doctor brands” and “clean beauty”. The formulas spoke for themselves, however having been told by multiple parties “I don’t believe in this concept,” the real challenge for Lisa and Lauren was convincing retailers that Goldfaden MD was worthy of shelf space. Worthy it proved to be, and what began as one hero product was swiftly built out into an entire portfolio, with every single product designed to address the most common skin concerns that Dr Goldfaden was finding himself presented with in-clinic. In this conversation, Lisa and Lauren share how a former fraternity brother is largely to thank for Goldfaden MD’s inception, the lessons from their respective careers in education and advertising that have helped them build a successful business, and the importance of finding designers, copywriters and vendors who understand and align with your brand. Read more at glowjournal.comFollow Goldfaden MD on Instagram @goldfadenmdStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    BONUS | Your Cosmetic Tattoo Removal Questions Answered

    25:29

    How does the cosmetic tattooing process actually work? How much does tattoo removal really hurt? After how many tattoo removal treatments can we expect to see results?In this Ask An Expert episode, host Gemma Watts is joined by Dermal Therapist Ginny Bucchi. Ginny specialises in skin rejuvenation and tattoo removal, and has performed over 2500 PicoWay treatments, on all skin types, since 2017, so we took the opportunity to ask her YOUR questions on cosmetic tattooing and tattoo removal. This Ask An Expert episode is sponsored by Candela Medical, however you won’t hear Ginny recommending specific brands or products. As per the rest of this Ask An Expert Series, we’ve sought qualified experts to give you objective answers to your questions so that you can take that information and make your own educated decisions regarding which treatments are right for you. In this episode, we’ve taken the questions YOU submitted on cosmetic tattoo removal to Ginny- from exactly how much pain to expect and how many treatments are actually necessary, through to how the tattoo removal process really works and, of course, the best way to choose your cosmetic tattoo artist and your tattoo removalist.You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.com/cosmetic-tattoo-and-tatoo-removalFollow Candela Medical on Instagram @candelamedicalanzDiscover more at candelamedia.comStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • Glow Journal podcast

    Terry de Gunzburg | Founder of By Terry

    1:06:03

    In episode seventy five of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to industry icon and By Terry founder, Terry de Gunzburg.Terry de Gunzburg tells me that the rose is in her DNA.Terry’s earliest memorable connection to beauty is her grandmother’s homemade rosewater. Terry herself spent her childhood applying rose petals to her cheeks to mimic the effect of blush, and today, the rose sits at the heart of one of her most iconic beauty creations- Baume De Rose. In her very early 20s, during a seasonal break between leaving medical school and commencing art school, Terry decided to take a four week course in cosmetics as nothing more than a creative outlet. In week four, in a moment of both desperation and serendipity, Terry was sent to a Vogue Paris photoshoot when no other makeup artist was available. It was on that day that Terry decided her future was in beauty.In 1985, Terry was approached by her a man she describes as her hero, Yves Saint Laurent, and became the brand’s Creative Director of beauty. It was here that Terry created a product that, quite literally, changed the way countless products were designed and used thereafter. A product that none of her colleagues wanted to launch, and a product that she spent three years convincing them was worth their time- Touche Éclat.In 1998, Terry created her own business, a line of couture, made-to-order cosmetics and opened a boutique in Paris. Demand was overwhelming and waiting lists were years long, so she expanded and developed that line into the brand we now know as By Terry. In this conversation, Terry shares the mistake that led to the creation of the now-iconic Baume De Rose, how she developed the first ever skincare in powder form, and the ways in which the beauty industry has changed since her time working with Linda Evangelista, Kate Moss and Guy Bourdin.Read more at glowjournal.comFollow By Terry on Instagram @byterryofficialStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at [email protected] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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