Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

#63 The Best Way to Juice after Bariatric Surgery

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Are you into juicing? Maybe you’ve even considered replacing your coffee with a green drink. Is there a best way to juice if you’ve had bariatric surgery? You bet there is.

Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 63. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.

If you’re looking for a private facebook group where you can ask questions and talk about what’s on your mind, please join me in Bariatric Surgery Success with dietitian Dr. Susan Mitchell.



Juicing breaks down fruits and vegetables into liquid form generally by separating the juice from the pulp. But it‘s the method of juicing that makes all the difference when you’ve had weight loss surgery.

Juicing can be a good option to increase your nutrient intake meaning vitamins, minerals, fiber and naturally occurring plant nutrients or what’s called phytonutrients. It’s also an easy way to incorporate additional vegetables and fruits into the diet, particularly less popular ones like kale or spinach. Ideally juicing should supplement the vegetables and fruits that you eat in whole form. Instead juicing often replaces these whole fruits and veggies.

There are two methods of juicing. First is traditional juicing, the type most common in juice bars, airports and hotels, where a fruit or vegetable is pressed or shredded. All of the pulp (another name for fiber) is removed using either a cold press or centrifuge juice extractor leaving only the juice.

But for anyone and especially if you’ve had bariatric surgery, you miss out on the benefits of fiber and they’re valuable. A few benefits include helping with digestion, reducing inflammation and increasing satiety or how full you feel. Do you remember in episode #47 on fighting inflammation with food, we talked about fiber. It’s digestible by gut bacteria making short chain fatty acids. What was that fatty acid in the gut called? Butyrate. What we love about butyrate is that it provides valuable health effects such as inhibiting the growth of bad bacteria, reducing inflammation and increasing mineral absorption.

Don’t forget, fiber also helps prevent constipation but sometimes it causes potential gas and bloating. Your juicing tip: start with a small portion, maybe 1/4 of a cup and see how it goes. It may be too bulky and filling to drink very much of it at a time.

So we don’t want to give up fiber easily. Besides, juice with no pulp or fiber packs more calories and carbs, mostly coming from the natural sugar found in fruit in a more concentrated form. For example, a cup of pineapple is about 80 calories, but a cup of pineapple juice is about 120. Juice is the most calorie-dense part of plant foods.

Did you know that the calories in a juice drink can range from 100 to 800, depending on the type of fruits and vegetables you add and the amounts? Remember that fruits tend to have more calories than vegetables so opt for more veggies and less fruit to keep calories reasonable. A good ratio is 75% veggies and 25% fruit or 3/4 veggies and 1/4 fruit. Portion size is always key too.

Here’s where the second method of juicing called whole juicing is superior. Whole juice is the result of blending vegetables and fruits into a drinkable liquid without removing the fiber. Whole juicing requires a high-powered blender instead of a juicer. You may be familiar with brands for home use such as a Blendtec, NutriBullet or Vitamix. When whole juicing, whole fruits and vegetables go in the blender with extra water, and a powerful motor pulverizes them into a smooth juice with the fiber included.

A study in the European Journal of Nutrition compared the effects of whole apples to apple juice in regard to the effects on blood lipids such as cholesterol. The results suggest that the fiber component found in the skin of apples is needed for the cholesterol-lowering effect and that clear apple juice is not a suitable substitute for the whole fruit. When the entire apple is used in whole juicing the benefits of the skin remain in the juice.

Your take aways:

1. Juicing can work for you after bariatric surgery as long as it’s whole juicing which retains the fiber and all of its benefits.

2. Aim for 3/4 veggies and 1/4 fruit to keep calories and carbs lower.

3. Always eat protein-packed foods first as that’s bariatric gold then have the juice.

4. Portion size is always key. Start small with 1/4 cup and see how you tolerate it. Any issues with bloating or gas?

Stay focused on your journey, you’re worth it.

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    #65 Snooze to Lose: The Tie Between Sleep and Weight

    453196:08:06

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Ever noticed that when you don’t sleep well, you’re more hungry than usual? If you don’t get enough sleep over time, what happens? Your weight starts to creep up, right? Is there a tie between sleep and weight regain?Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 65. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.By the way, if you’re searching for a private facebook group where you can ask questions and talk about what’s on your mind, come join me. The group is called Bariatric Surgery Success with dietitian Dr. Susan Mitchell. Link to private Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/bariatricsurgerysuccesswithdrsusanmitchellWhat’s going on with your right now? Do you find yourself sleeping less and less? How many hours of sleep a night do you average? Seven? Six? Five? Less than that? Are you dragging during the day? Feeling irritable?On average, we're sleeping an hour an a half less a night than 20 years ago. The saying you snooze, you lose definitely takes on a new meaning when you’re talking weight regain.Sound science says that sleep deprivation, defined as under six hours of sleep a night, results in the increased production of the hunger hormone ghrelin. Too little sleep also kicks up your stress level by increasing the stress hormone cortisol which then increases your appetite. What if you’re trying to get more sleep yet have a lot of stress in your life? Does stress affect your sleep? So here’s the question. Is it stress that makes you have trouble sleeping, eat more and regain weight or is it too little sleep that makes you more stressed, eat more and gain?Plus do you notice that when you don’t get enough sleep, you’re not only hungry, but you have an attitude? Call it angry and hungry or maybe you’ve heard the word for both anger and hunger. You’re hangry. Bottom line: the less sleep you get, the more it fuels hunger with reports of eating up to 1000 calories more per day and a bad attitude.A better night’s sleep potentially means less weight regain and more productive days. THE GOOD NEWS: When you increase the amount of sleep you get and average 7-8 hours per night, hunger hormones and hunger itself seem to return to normal.Try these tips to help you get that solid 7-8 hours of shut eye:1. Most important: make the decision that you’re going to get more sleep. Then set a reminder, start a get-ready-for-bed routine, whatever it takes and then go to bed at the same time each night so your body learns a routine and starts to tell you that it’s bedtime. 2. Unplug for 30 minutes before bed: research shows that the bright lights from your favorite devices including cell phones, TV, computers and tablets decrease the body’s production of melatonin, a hormone whose job it is to help make you feel tired and ready to fall asleep. 3. Keep your room cool and dark so your body wants to sleep.4. Listen to relaxing music or meditations or sounds that de-stress you like ocean waves or rain. 5. Stressed and you know it? Actually set a worry time, think about your issues, journal your thoughts if you want and then let them go for the night.Sleep is like nutrition for your brain. You’ve got to have it. Speaking of nutrition to help you sleep. Try these two tips. Include bananas, fish, oats, and chickpeas in your diet. These foods contain vitamin B6, which helps the body produce melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone.As you can tolerate them, eat tart cherries (they can be dried, fresh or frozen) and nuts regularly as they contain melatonin.Recipe for Chocolate Cherry Bread. The recipe calls for tart cherries, walnuts and banana. It’s scrumptious. Spread almond or peanut butter on a slice or half slice depending on your portion needs for a snack.Remember, better sleep and more sleep begins with you making the decision that you’ll go to bed and increase the hours you sleep. Tweak your diet with the melatonin and B-6 rich foods. Try some of the sleep tips. Let me know how they work for you.Stay focused on your journey, you're worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #64 Bariatric Mental Health Q & A #3: Your Questions Answered

    453196:18:48

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% I received this question for Dr. Connie: I was bullied and I hate the way it made me feel. I attended a group exercise class and was verbally bullied in front of everyone by another girl in the class. She made very mean remarks about my weight and why I was even there. Please, tell me, how do I handle these bullies? Don’t go anywhere because Dr. Connie's back! Psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton, who specializes in bariatric surgery is here to tell you how to handle a bully.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 64. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Joining me today via Skype is Atlanta-based psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton. If you’ve been lucky enough to already hear Dr. Connie on the podcast, you know she has vast experience in the field of bariatrics and shares practical skills for improving your post op relationships with food, other people and most importantly your relationship with yourself. She teaches you better ways to deal with life’s stuff. This week she’s taking on the bullies.Dr. Connie's Information Website: http://www.conniestapletonphd.comBariAftercare: The Podcast; available on phone podcast apps, Apple podcasts and most other podcatchers My resources for you: https://BreakingDownNutrition.com/resources S: Welcome back to the podcast, Dr. Connie!S: You heard the question at the beginning about the woman who attended a group exercise class and was verbally bullied in front of everyone by another girl in the class. She made mean remarks about her weight and why this person even showed up. Today I want to dig deep on bullying as it’s a big problem for anyone dealing with weight issues.Questions we discuss. One of the best episodes yet with spot on information and strategies.1. Dr. Connie, what makes someone bully another person whether it’s over weight or any issue?2. When you’re bullied in a public venue, like this exercise class, how do you handle it?3. What about when you’re cyber bullied?4. Bullying also happens one on one. How do you stop it? 5. How do you personally cope, heal and then move forward from being bullied?Dr Connie, such good information. Any last thought to leave us with?I hope today’s episode has given you insight, knowledge and strategies to handle any bully you may encounter. If you have more questions you want Dr. Connie to answer the next time she’s here, please contact me thru my website. You can also messenger me thru Facebook or reply to one of my newsletters. I read every email that comes in. Take care of you. You’re worth it! 
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #63 The Best Way to Juice after Bariatric Surgery

    453200:07:39

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Are you into juicing? Maybe you’ve even considered replacing your coffee with a green drink. Is there a best way to juice if you’ve had bariatric surgery? You bet there is.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 63. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.If you’re looking for a private facebook group where you can ask questions and talk about what’s on your mind, please join me in Bariatric Surgery Success with dietitian Dr. Susan Mitchell. Juicing breaks down fruits and vegetables into liquid form generally by separating the juice from the pulp. But it‘s the method of juicing that makes all the difference when you’ve had weight loss surgery.Juicing can be a good option to increase your nutrient intake meaning vitamins, minerals, fiber and naturally occurring plant nutrients or what’s called phytonutrients. It’s also an easy way to incorporate additional vegetables and fruits into the diet, particularly less popular ones like kale or spinach. Ideally juicing should supplement the vegetables and fruits that you eat in whole form.  Instead juicing often replaces these whole fruits and veggies.There are two methods of juicing. First is traditional juicing, the type most common in juice bars, airports and hotels, where a fruit or vegetable is pressed or shredded. All of the pulp (another name for fiber) is removed using either a cold press or centrifuge juice extractor leaving only the juice.But for anyone and especially if you’ve had bariatric surgery, you miss out on the benefits of fiber and they’re valuable. A few benefits include helping with digestion, reducing inflammation and increasing satiety or how full you feel. Do you remember in episode #47 on fighting inflammation with food, we talked about fiber. It’s digestible by gut bacteria making short chain fatty acids. What was that fatty acid in the gut called? Butyrate. What we love about butyrate is that it provides valuable health effects such as inhibiting the growth of bad bacteria, reducing inflammation and increasing mineral absorption.Don’t forget, fiber also helps prevent constipation but sometimes it causes potential gas and bloating. Your juicing tip: start with a small portion, maybe 1/4 of a cup and see how it goes. It may be too bulky and filling to drink very much of it at a time.So we don’t want to give up fiber easily. Besides, juice with no pulp or fiber packs more calories and carbs, mostly coming from the natural sugar found in fruit in a more concentrated form. For example, a cup of pineapple is about 80 calories, but a cup of pineapple juice is about 120. Juice is the most calorie-dense part of plant foods.Did you know that the calories in a juice drink can range from 100 to 800, depending on the type of fruits and vegetables you add and the amounts? Remember that fruits tend to have more calories than vegetables so opt for more veggies and less fruit to keep calories reasonable. A good ratio is 75% veggies and 25% fruit or 3/4 veggies and 1/4 fruit. Portion size is always key too.Here’s where the second method of juicing called whole juicing is superior. Whole juice is the result of blending vegetables and fruits into a drinkable liquid without removing the fiber. Whole juicing requires a high-powered blender instead of a juicer. You may be familiar with brands for home use such as a Blendtec, NutriBullet or Vitamix. When whole juicing, whole fruits and vegetables go in the blender with extra water, and a powerful motor pulverizes them into a smooth juice with the fiber included.A study in the European Journal of Nutrition compared the effects of whole apples to apple juice in regard to the effects on blood lipids such as cholesterol. The results suggest that the fiber component found in the skin of apples is needed for the cholesterol-lowering effect and that clear apple juice is not a suitable substitute for the whole fruit. When the entire apple is used in whole juicing the benefits of the skin remain in the juice.Your take aways:1. Juicing can work for you after bariatric surgery as long as it’s whole juicing which retains the fiber and all of its benefits.2. Aim for 3/4 veggies and 1/4 fruit to keep calories and carbs lower.3. Always eat protein-packed foods first as that’s bariatric gold then have the juice.4. Portion size is always key. Start small with 1/4 cup and see how you tolerate it. Any issues with bloating or gas?Stay focused on your journey, you’re worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #62 Support Your Immune System with These 5 Vitamins & Minerals

    8:03

    Want a strong and heathy immune system? Who doesn’t right? The foods you eat and the vitamins and minerals they contain play a starring role in keeping your immune system in top form. Let’s talk about 5 vitamins and minerals that are among the top contenders for supporting immunity and then, where you find them in food. Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 62. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening. During the covid pandemic we hear a lot about immunity and compromised immune systems. What is your immune system? Think of it like the Internet and an intricate broadband network where you have to be on guard for hackers. Your immune system is also an intricate system that goes into action when it determines that some type of foreign invader has tried to hack into your body in the form of bacteria, viruses and parasites. Your body needs numerous vitamins and minerals in order to keep your immune system strong and alert. Think of it like training for the Olympics. It takes time, practice and focus to succeed in your sport. It’s the same with your immunity. The goal is to focus on eating foods loaded with vitamins and minerals day after day over time so that when your immunity is challenged by illness, it’s optimized and ready to respond. Let’s focus on 5 vitamins and minerals important in supporting immunity along with what they do and where to find them in food. 1. Vitamin C: known for its role in the healing process and the ability to fight infection and potentially shorten how long an infection lasts. What food first comes to your mind when you think of Vitamin C? Citrus, like oranges, tangerines and grapefruit? They’re great sources but don’t forget about papaya, spinach, broccoli, bell peppers and berries like blackberries and strawberries and kiwi. It’s rare that you need extra vitamin C supplements as it’s easy to find in so many foods. 2. Vitamin D: you may have heard vitamin D mentioned a lot in the Covid conversation. It’s one one of the most powerful vitamins for your immunity. However, there are not a lot of food sources. Salmon, tuna and sardines, egg yolks and some mushrooms contain vitamin D and also fortified products like orange juice, milk and various cereals. What does fortified mean? Fortified means that the food item did not originally contain vitamin D so it was added to it similar to adding vitamin D to a multi vitamin supplement but in food. Vitamin D is one of those vitamins that you will likely need from both food and supplements in order to reach the blood level needed. Go back and listen to podcast #54 It covers the must have vitamin and mineral supplements after bariatric surgery. Part 2 covers vitamin  D more in depth and the benefits of vitamin D3. 3. Zinc: found mainly in animal foods, zinc helps the body make new immune system cells.  Oysters, crab, shrimp and mussels along with lean meats and poultry are all sources but you can find zinc in legumes, like chickpeas, lentils and beans. Don’t forget milk, cheese and nuts such as peanuts, cashews and almonds. Lots of choices for zinc so it's rare that you need extra beyond what will be in your food and daily bariatric multi. 4. Iron: your body uses iron to help carry oxygen to cells and is active in many immune processes. In other episodes we’ve talked about how important iron is after bariatric surgery and that it’s one of the minerals you’re likely to be low in. As a reminder, the body more easily absorbs and uses iron from animal products called heme iron. Plants can also be sources of iron too but it’s not absorbed and used as well by the body. Think about adding various beans such as black or kidney along with kale and broccoli to your diet. 5. Vitamin E: also helps regulate immune functions. Some food sources of vitamin E include nuts, seeds, avocado and spinach. What did you notice about nuts and spinach? They’ve  been mentioned already for their zinc and vitamin C content. This is the beauty of food. Foods are typically not just a one-vitamin wonder, but supply a team of nutrients working together for your benefit. That’s why food first is a smart focus followed by supplements rounding out what you need more of due to your surgery. So remember, vitamins C, D and E along with zinc and iron help support your immunity. Be sure and choose some of the foods we talked about for your daily diet to keep your immunity system healthy. Stay focused on your journey, you’re worth it.

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