Airing Pain podcast

126: Domestic Violence and Chronic Pain

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This edition has been funded by the Women’s Fund for Scotland.

The Coronavirus pandemic has been long and isolating for everyone, but particularly for those who experience abuse. The pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have seen an increase in the level and severity of domestic abuse. 

In this episode of Airing Pain, our host Paul Evans discusses the isolating effects of Covid-19, trauma and how this can contribute to the development of debilitating chronic illnesses such as Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 

An article by author and domestic abuse survivor Kath Twigg will accompany this extended episode of Airing Pain. You can read all the related articles from related to this programme in this issue of Pain Press, our free online supplement.

Contributors: 

  • Kath Twigg, Senior Lecturer in social work, trainer, mentor, writer, and domestic abuse survivor
  • Dr Lene Forrester, Clinical Psychologist at Albyn Hospital, Aberdeen
  • Dr Joht Singh Chandan, Academic Clinical Lecturer at the Murray Learning Centre, University of Birmingham
  • Dr Kate Gillan, Clinical Psychologist for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
  • Professor. Caroline Bradbury-Jones, head of Gender-Based Violence and Health at the University of Birmingham.
More Information:

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    124: Diabetic Neuropathy

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    This edition has been supported by a grant from The Champ Trust and Foundation Scotland. According to the most recent Scottish Diabetes Survey in 2018, there are an estimated 304,000 people living with a diagnosis of diabetes in Scotland, around 5% of the population. A long-term effect of diabetes can be the development of diabetic neuropathy. This edition of Airing Pain focuses on neuropathic pain in people with diabetes, and how the X-PERT diabetes courses helps people to deal with the complications that arise when living with diabetes. First up, Paul Evans speaks to David Bennett, Professor of Neurology at the University of Oxford, who outlines the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes and how the initial treatment plan differs between the types. Professor Bennett then goes on to describe how neuropathy develops in people living with diabetes and how neuropathic pain manifests. Paul then talks with Steve Sims, who lives with diabetic neuropathy as a result of type 2 diabetes. Paul and Steve discuss how they have adjusted their diets to deal with type 2 diabetes and how the X-PERT diabetes course has helped them to adjust to living with diabetes.  Contributors: Professor Dave Bennett, Professor of Neurology, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford Steve Sims, Secretary, Cardiff Diabetes Group. More information: The X-PERT diabetes courses – diabetes.co.uk/education/x-pert.html British Pain Society – britishpainsociety.org  Pain Concern leaflet on Neuropathic Pain – painconcern.org.uk/neuropathic-pain  Pain Concern leaflet on Diet and Pain – painconcern.org.uk/diet-and-pain/ IASP Global Year for the Prevention of Pain 2020 – iasp-pain.org/GlobalYear. With thanks to: The British Pain Society (BPS), who facilitated the interviews at their Annual Scientific Meeting in 2019 - britishpainsociety.org The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) iasp-pain.org Diabetes UK, a leading UK charity that involves sharing knowledge on diabetes - www.diabetes.org.uk/.
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    123: Opioids and Chronic Pain

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    This edition has been supported by a grant from Kyowa Kirin. The opioid crisis reached its peak in the United States in 2017, where addiction and overprescription have led to 218,000 deaths from prescription overdoses between the years of 1999 and 2017. The side effects of opioids can affect the day-to-day activities of people managing long-term or chronic pain, yet society as a whole has yet to fully evaluate the relationship between opioids and addiction.  In this edition of Airing Pain, producer Paul Evans talks to two leading pain specialists. First off, Paul Evans meets with Dr Srinivasa Raja, who discusses opioids effects on the body’s opioid receptors and how the human body processes pain. Dr Cathy Stannard then talks about the increase of opioid prescriptions in the UK and how the opioid crisis in the United Kingdom developed. In the second half of the programme, Paul speaks with Louise Trewern, a chronic pain patient and patient advocate, about opioids’ detrimental effect on her quality of life and how she was able to transition towards more effective methods of chronic pain management. Finally, Paul sits down with Dr Jim Huddy, a GP in Cornwall, who explains how the medical community is re-evaluating the relationship between opioids and chronic pain. Contributors: Dr Srinivasa Raja, Professor of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA  Dr Cathy Stannard, Consultant in Pain Medicine and Pain Transformation Programme Clinical Lead for NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group Louise Trewern, Vice Chair of the Patient Voice Committee at the British Pain Society Dr Jim Huddy, Cornwall GP and Clinical Lead for Chronic Pain at NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group. More information: British Pain Society – britishpainsociety.org  Opioid prescribing for chronic pain guidance – england.nhs.uk/south/info-professional/safe-use-of-controlled-drugs/opioids Faculty of Pain Medicine’s opioids resources – fpm.ac.uk/opioids-aware. With thanks to: The British Pain Society (BPS), who facilitated the interviews at their Annual Scientific Meeting in 2019 - britishpainsociety.org The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) iasp-pain.org.
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    This editionhas been supported with a grant from The Mirianog Trust donated for this purpose. It was recorded at the end of April 2020, the second month of the UK’s Covid-19 lockdown. All interviews were recorded prior to the crisis. As research for a Covid-19 vaccine is a priority for the scientific community, this edition of Airing Pain focuses on the roles of researchers, and in particular the many disciplines that come together to increase the understanding, and therefore the management of chronic pain. First up, Paul Evans speaks to neurologist Claudia Sommer, whose research into fibromyalgia opens debate as to whether the condition should be treated as neuropathic pain. Physiotherapist David Easton then talks about the research-led ESCAPE PAIN rehabilitation exercise programme for people with osteoarthritis in their hips or knees. And finally, Paul visits the University of Bristol, where neuroscientist Bridget Lumb talks of the need for further research into the link between familiar contact and social interaction with chronic pain – particularly relevant at a time of social distancing – and social anthropologist Rachael Gooberman-Hill explains the role of the anthropologist in health and pain research. Contributors: Dr Claudia Sommer, Professor of Neurology at the University of Würzburg in Germany and President-Elect of the International Association for the Study of Pain David Easton, Physiotherapist at the Hywel Dda University Health Board in West Wales Dr Bridget Lumb, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Bristol Dr Rachael Gooberman-Hill, Professor of Health and Anthropology and Director of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Research at the University of Bristol. More information: Fibromyalgia Action UK - fmauk.org With thanks to: The British Pain Society (BPS), who facilitated the interviews at their Annual Scientific Meeting in 2019 - britishpainsociety.org The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) iasp-pain.org.
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    121: Living with Persistent Pain in Wales

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    This edition has been partially funded by an educational grant from Grünenthal Limited, donated for this purpose. In April 2019, the Minister for Health and Social Services in Wales launched the guidance document Living with Persistent Pain in Wales. Later, in December, the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition brought together some of Wales’s leading pain experts at the home of the Welsh parliament (or Senedd Cymru) in Cardiff, at an event chaired by Neil Betteridge, co-chair of the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition, a group which brings together a wide range of chronic pain stakeholders including professional bodies, patient organisations, parliamentarians and industry representatives from across the UK. This edition of Airing Pain was recorded live at the event, where clinicians, academics, policy-makers and people living with pain came together to discuss both the new document and the future of chronic pain services across the region. With thanks to the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition, the Welsh Government and the conference organisers for facilitating the recording of this event. Contributors: Neil Betteridge, Co-Chair, Chronic Pain Policy Coalition Dr Paul Cameron, Specialty Advisor to the Chief Medical Officer for Scotland  Professor Ernest Choy, Head of Rheumatology, Cardiff University Mary Cowern, Wales Director, Versus Arthritis David Easton, Physiotherapist,  Hywel Da NHS Trust Dr Lucy Morris, GP partner, Bellevue Practice, Newport Professor Ann Taylor, Professor in Medical Education, Cardiff University. More information: The Chronic Pain Policy Coalition – chronicpainpolicycoalition.com  Versus Arthritis – versusarthritis.org  Welsh Pain Society – welshpainsociety.org.uk Living with Persistent Pain in Wales PDF guidelines.
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    120: Osteoporosis

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    This edition has been supported by a grant from The D’Oyly Carte Charitable Trust. Osteoporosis is a largely ignored condition that affects over 3 million people in the UK, with women being more at risk; a condition which, because the symptoms are difficult to notice by patients, is often referred to as the ‘silent disease’. In this edition of Airing Pain, we learn why prevention, assessment and management are key factors to deal with this condition and develop a correct model of care in the health services. First-off, Paul Evans speaks to Dr Emma Clark, Consultant in Rheumatology & Osteoporosis at North Bristol Trust, to find out about the causes and characteristics of osteoporosis. She discusses how osteoporosis can be ignored or misdiagnosed as osteoarthritis, as well as ways in which we can look after our bone health. Dr Clark also talks about how she is currently developing a clinical tool for primary care professionals to help them identify signs of osteoporosis when they meet with their patients. Paul also speaks to Sarah Leyland, Nurse Consultant at the Royal Osteoporosis Society, about the new focus on prevention, mainly in terms of lifestyle changes and developing a model of care designed to identify people who are at higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. She also describes the range of physical exercises she has developed to reduce the risk of fractures and help with pain after fractures. Contributors: Dr Emma Clark, Rheumatology & Osteoporosis Consultant at North Bristol NHS Trust Sarah Leyland, Osteoporosis Nurse Consultant at the Royal Osteoporosis Society.  More information: Royal Osteoporosis Society - ros.org.uk

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