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59. Aim to be a Zero

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What does your life have in common with that of an astronaut? A lot, it turns out. Dan Mccollum returns to Stimulus to break down the skills learned by International Space Station commander Chris Hadfield as explained in his autobiography An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth.

 

Listen on:

 

 We Discuss:

  • The pitfalls of thinking too highly of yourself.  [1:46]
  • On the importance of being a “plus one” and the wisdom of not proclaiming your plus-oneness.  “If you’re really a plus one, people will notice”. [2:23]
  • Aim to be a zero -- having neutral impact.  Observe and learn. Pitch in with the grunt work. Being a zero is a good way to get to plus one.[5:08]
  • What Mccollum looks for in EM residency applicants:  people who treat the receptionist or program administrator well. [8:00]
  • Focus on the simple core things which are most likely to save lives, as opposed to shooting for the stars with cutting edge treatment.  [8:48]
  • On why the weight and power of ego impairs our ability to learn and harms patients. [11:04]
  • Sweat the small stuff. [13:01]
  • The quintessential nature of EM and how they’re similar to flight rules:  solving complex problems rapidly with incomplete information.  [13:49]
  • Why we should be using checklists, particularly when we think we don’t have time for them. [14:47]
  • Even when you follow all the rules, sometimes bad things happen. Perfectionism is not part of the flight rules. [15:49]
  • Why early success is a terrible teacher.  If you’ve always been the star and never experienced failure, this can be a barrier to learning. [18:27]
  • Jocko Willink video, Good. When bad things happen and you get knocked down, “get up, dust off, reload, recalibrate, re-engage, and go out on the attack”. [20:13]
  • When in a position of leadership, be careful with your words.  Don’t ridicule. The small things we do or say can have a big impact. [22:00]
  • Expeditionary behavior is the willingness to endure hardships for the sake of the mission. And why whining poisons the pool.  [24:13]

 

References:

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield

 

More stuff you’ll want to know:

To learn more about The Stimululs Podcast, sign up for newsletter, or contact us CLICK HERE

If you like what you hear on Stimulus and use Apple/iTunes as your podcatcher, please consider leaving a review of the show. I read all the reviews and, more importantly, so do potential guests. Thanks in advance!

Interested in sponsoring this podcast? Connect with us here

 

Follow Rob:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/emergencypdx

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stimuluswithrobormanmd

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/emergencypdx

 

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