Rift Valley Institute podcast

Rift Valley Institute

Rift Valley Institute

The Rift Valley Institute is a non-profit research and training organization working with communities and institutions in Eastern and Central Africa. RVI programmes connect local knowledge to global information systems, aiming to modify development practice. They include field-based social research, support for indigenous educational institutions, in-country training courses and a digital library. www.riftvalley.net

101 épisodes

  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Book Launch: When Peace Kills Politics

    1:43:00

    Over the past two decades, the Horn and Eastern Africa Region have witnessed a proliferation of peace-making and peace-building processes as a means of democratisation. A wealth and power sharing governance arrangements designed and upheld by regional and international institutions often saw the transfer of political decision-making away from the local and national level, consolidating them instead in the hands of belligerent elites and a global technocratic class of experts. How have these forms of international diplomatic interventions shaped prospects for peace and democratisation in the region? Sharath Srinivasan’s When Peace Kills Politics: International Intervention and Unending Wars in the Sudans (Hurst/OUP, 2021) provides a refreshing appraisal of the theory and practice of peace-making by drawing attention to its inherent contradictions that contain risks of violent failure. The book launch engaged the history of interrelated peace-making efforts and their failures in Sudan and South Sudan, from the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement to the more recent Juba Peace Agreement signed in 2020, and their potential to subvert non-violent civic politics. The book launch was co-hosted and organised jointly by RVI and the International African Institute and supported by Hurst publishers
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Understanding The Coup In Khartoum; Drivers, Latest Developments and Consequences for Sudan

    1:20:56

    This podcast recording of an RVI forum on Sudan's political developments discusses the current situation following the military coup, whether a military dictatorship is inevitable and the possible implications of it on domestic affairs and international support.
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

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  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    What Are The Alternatives To Elections?

    23:44

    Over the past year, countries across the East Africa region have held elections to elect leaders at various levels. These polls have been accompanied by complaints over irregularities, violence and a general lack of credibility. In Uganda and Tanzania, disputed polls and allegations of rigging by incumbents were followed by brutal crackdowns on democratic freedoms. In Ethiopia, despite the AU’s election observer mission declaring the twice-postponed election “orderly, peaceful and credible”, a fifth of the country failed to take part in voting owing to an opposition boycott, war and insecurity, and logistical problems. Somalia’s failure to hold long- delayed indirect elections has endangered its fragile peace. While in Somaliland-despite urban low voter turnout and ballot tampering in the rural areas, the long delayed parliamentary and local council elections were smoothly run leading to a surprise loss to the ruling party and a peaceful transfer of power. Still, harassment of opposition candidates during campaigns - and women exclusion remain a feature of the electoral process. All this begs the question; Are elections in East Africa a democratising force or a flashpoint for violence?
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    1. Are Elections Even Necessary

    25:17

    Over the past year, countries across the East Africa region have held elections to elect leaders at various levels. These polls have been accompanied by complaints over irregularities, violence and a general lack of credibility. In Uganda and Tanzania, disputed polls and allegations of rigging by incumbents were followed by brutal crackdowns on democratic freedoms. In Ethiopia, despite the AU’s election observer mission declaring the twice-postponed election “orderly, peaceful and credible”, a fifth of the country failed to take part in voting owing to an opposition boycott, war and insecurity, and logistical problems. Somalia’s failure to hold long- delayed indirect elections has endangered its fragile peace. While in Somaliland-despite urban low voter turnout and ballot tampering in the rural areas, the long delayed parliamentary and local council elections were smoothly run leading to a surprise loss to the ruling party and a peaceful transfer of power. Still, harassment of opposition candidates during campaigns - and women exclusion remain a feature of the electoral process. All this begs the question; Are elections in East Africa a democratising force or a flashpoint for violence?
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Voting for Change; Sudan's Election Project Podcast, 3rd and final episode

    27:10

    Professor Munzoul, Dean of Scientific Enquiry at Khartoum university explores to what degree has electoral management and the role of the National Elections Council (NEC) determined the success and quality of elections? and moving forward in the post revolution period, should the 2024 projected elections rely on the existing network of experienced administrators or aim to create a new generation? In Debate with Professor Justin- Durham University on how electoral politics actually work i.e how campaigns are run, how different grassroots politics have actually been between liberal election like 1986 and the NCP's elections i,e are there similarities? T
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    المدونة الثانيه من مشروع انتخابات السودان- حوار مع بروف منزول العسل - جامعة الخرطوم

    22:17

    في الحلقة الثانية من السلسلة الصوتية 'انتخابات السودان' نناقش- على الرغم من الاستياء الشعبي من الأحزاب والعمليات السياسية - الدور الذي يمكن أن يلعبه المجتمع المدني في تحقيق الديمقراطية من خلال انتخابات حرة ونزيهة.
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Sudan Elections Project- Discussion with Professor Justin Willis

    24:40

    In this audio series we discuss, among other things, election models adopted in Sudan's modern history. It will also discuss the key choices available for policymakers who are involved in election design.
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Inside Somalia's Elections I

    21:24

    After a period of political impasse, leaders in Somalia— under the leadership of Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble— have agreed to a timetable for indirect elections in 2021. Elections for the Upper House are now scheduled for 25 July, for the Lower House between 10 August and 10 September, with the presidential election scheduled for 10 October. Though easing tensions, especially in the capital Mogadishu where armed forces had confronted each other in April, the agreement left several crucial elements of the electoral process unaddressed, including the selection process of delegates and the mechanism for ensuring the 30 percent quota for women’s seats in the Parliament, security management and electoral funding. At the same time, Puntland Federal State is testing a one-person-one vote electoral model for local council elections in three districts - Qardho, Eyl, and Ufeyn. This is a significant development, because a successfully managed electoral process in Puntland could provide a model for a broader democratization process across Somalia. On 15 July 2021, the Rift Valley Institute in collaboration with Heinrich Boll Foundation and The Elephant hosted a panel discussion to examine these issues and prospects for peaceful elections. The webinar also explored what the democratization process in Puntland could mean for Somalia’s long term democratic trajectory. Speakers Moderator- Mary Harper BBC Panelists Abdinassir Yusuf-Puntland Development & Research Centre (PDRC) Idil Ibrahim - Life and Peace Institute Ruqia Botan - LeadNow Omar Mahmood - International Crisis Group
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Inside Somalia's Elections II

    38:18

    After a period of political impasse, leaders in Somalia— under the leadership of Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble— have agreed to a timetable for indirect elections in 2021. Elections for the Upper House are now scheduled for 25 July, for the Lower House between 10 August and 10 September, with the presidential election scheduled for 10 October. Though easing tensions, especially in the capital Mogadishu where armed forces had confronted each other in April, the agreement left several crucial elements of the electoral process unaddressed, including the selection process of delegates and the mechanism for ensuring the 30 percent quota for women’s seats in the Parliament, security management and electoral funding. At the same time, Puntland Federal State is testing a one-person-one vote electoral model for local council elections in three districts - Qardho, Eyl, and Ufeyn. This is a significant development, because a successfully managed electoral process in Puntland could provide a model for a broader democratization process across Somalia. On 15 July 2021, the Rift Valley Institute in collaboration with Heinrich Boll Foundation and The Elephant hosted a panel discussion to examine these issues and prospects for peaceful elections. The webinar also explored what the democratization process in Puntland could mean for Somalia’s long term democratic trajectory. Speakers Moderator- Mary Harper BBC Panelists Abdinassir Yusuf-Puntland Development & Research Centre (PDRC) Idil Ibrahim - Life and Peace Institute Ruqia Botan - LeadNow Omar Mahmood - International Crisis Group
  • Rift Valley Institute podcast

    Inside Somalia's Elections III

    35:54

    After a period of political impasse, leaders in Somalia— under the leadership of Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble— have agreed to a timetable for indirect elections in 2021. Elections for the Upper House are now scheduled for 25 July, for the Lower House between 10 August and 10 September, with the presidential election scheduled for 10 October. Though easing tensions, especially in the capital Mogadishu where armed forces had confronted each other in April, the agreement left several crucial elements of the electoral process unaddressed, including the selection process of delegates and the mechanism for ensuring the 30 percent quota for women’s seats in the Parliament, security management and electoral funding. At the same time, Puntland Federal State is testing a one-person-one vote electoral model for local council elections in three districts - Qardho, Eyl, and Ufeyn. This is a significant development, because a successfully managed electoral process in Puntland could provide a model for a broader democratization process across Somalia. On 15 July 2021, the Rift Valley Institute in collaboration with Heinrich Boll Foundation and The Elephant hosted a panel discussion to examine these issues and prospects for peaceful elections. The webinar also explored what the democratization process in Puntland could mean for Somalia’s long term democratic trajectory. Speakers Moderator- Mary Harper BBC Panelists Abdinassir Yusuf-Puntland Development & Research Centre (PDRC) Idil Ibrahim - Life and Peace Institute Ruqia Botan - LeadNow Omar Mahmood - International Crisis Group

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