Checks and Balance from The Economist podcast

Checks and Balance: Beef encounter

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At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey. Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. Could they cut back?

The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.

John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.

We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/uspodsurvey


For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod




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    39:35

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 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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