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On today’s episode of Vital Metabolic, hosts James Wheeler and John Parker speak with Natalia, known as the Qigong Lady. Hear about the benefits of a qigong practice, both on its own and as a complementary practice to other forms of fitness. Learn about how Natalia discovered qigong, why the practice isn’t for everyone, and how you can get started.

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • 1:49 - Natalia is originally from Russia and now lives in Abu Dhabi after traveling around quite a lot.
  • 2:40 - Natalia began her qigong practice when she was living in Thailand.
  • 3:06 - She was curious about tai-chi, energy practices, and spirituality, but she had trouble finding tai-chi classes and found qigong instead.
  • 4:59 - With healing practices like qigong, it’s really about drawing energy into the body and controlling it, unlike strength and conditioning which is about the output of energy.
  • 5:30 - Qigong is deeply spiritual and you aren’t going to build on your practice if you only focus on your body.
  • 7:10 - Qigong is a broad practice that means working with energy, and there are different forms or branches that exist underneath it. Some can be considered martial arts, others healing practice, and more.
  • 8:16 - Natalia practices medical qigong, in which the forms are very dynamic and are integrated into your body’s movements.
  • 10:50 - Natalia uses qigong as her main fitness practice, but sometimes adds things like yoga practice; qigong complements every form.
  • 13:00 - In group classes, Natalia teaches the form she studied the most, but if a private client comes to her with a specific issue, Natalia chooses the qigong forms that would be most beneficial.
  • 15:16 - John has seen people doing qigong in the five minute breaks people take between weightlifting sets to balance their energy.
  • 16:09 - Qigong allows you to choose what will work best for you each day.
  • 17:46 - Each form of qigong uses a different style of breathing.
  • 20:05 - Natalia combines individual and group classes, as well as workshops.
  • 20:54 - She started with qigong somewhat later in life, as an adult, but she believes it came to her at exactly the right moment.
  • 22:28 - She sees common injuries or conditions from people who come in for general qigong practice, including postural misalignments and other internal blockages.
  • 23:01 - Everything in the body is connected, so an injury may not have originated in the spot where the pain is, but in a connected joint that isn’t as mobile as it should be.
  • 24:00 - An injury means a blockage in energy or a break in the flow of your chi.
  • 26:35 - Qigong has been growing because people are realizing they need to find alternative ways of finding flow and healing.
  • 27:25 - People often have perceptions of tai-chi or qigong as being done by old people in a park, but having Natalia be a representative for it makes it more accessible.
  • 28:00 - The pandemic has actually helped Natalia’s business because people suddenly had the time to dedicate to trainings and helped people realize they needed to focus more on their health.
  • 30:53 - Natalia is a perfectionist and wanted to go as deep into qigong as she could as fast as she could, but she had to learn to be patient and listen to her body.
  • 31:48 - It’s important not to practice to the point of fatigue every day or else you won’t have anything left for the next day.
  • 33:15 - Natalia thinks the industry is doing well and wants it to reach more people, but qigong isn’t for everyone because it requires patience and dedication over a longer period of time.
  • 34:00 - It’s about increasing the awareness about it and making it accessible to those who want to learn.
  • 35:15 - Natalia’s practice looks different every day depending on how she feels, but the typical length of practice is 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  • 36:26 - She ran online classes back in December but is running another series this month.
  • 37:20 - She also offers a lot of free classes on the White Tiger Qigong Youtube channel.

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Qigong integrates a physical practice with a mental and spiritual practice.
  2. It is a broad term with many types of qigong practice, meaning it can complement any other fitness practice and can be adjusted to fit any person’s needs.
  3. Natalia hopes to make qigong practice more accessible and to spread awareness.

 

Tweetable Quotes: 

  • “Everything happens because of the intention. Because of that deep, spiritual aspect of qigong. If you just do the form and you call it qigong but you focus only on the body, you won’t be building much of qi.” –Natalia
  • “Qigong is very diverse. You are taught different things in different forms and different meditations. And on a daily basis you choose what works best for you.” –Natalia
  • “In our culture, we think that more is better. Especially with exercise, people run themselves into the ground until they’re no longer physically able to do that... I tell my clients that we always leave the session with a half a tank of gas left.” –John Parker

 

Resources Mentioned: 

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Hear Cliff share his tips to help new trainers get started and build their businesses, the pros and cons of online training, and whether you should spend time on Instagram marketing.   Episode Highlights:  1:10 - Clifton Harski is the Director of Education for the Pain-Free Performance Specialist certification with previous Vital Metabolic guest John Rusin. 3:29 - Cliff’s business has been going well; he’s been working on the curriculum for the PPSC full-time and training their presenters to do the presentations. 4:16 - The business Cliff was previously a part owner of prior to COVID had to close. 7:35 - If Cliff was a new trainer starting right now, he would split his time between personal training and group fitness. 9:07 - In group training, you need to be able to fix someone’s form and come up with a solution very quickly, and that experience can be really helpful in one-on-one training. It also allows you to see many more and a wider range of people. 11:05 - You can also use the group setting to get to know people and develop them into higher paying 1-on-1 clients. 12:55 - A lot of marketing wisdom will tell you to hyper-specialize, but it’s better for a trainer to have range and be more general in your approach until opportunities to focus more present itself. 16:55 - You need to define what an “online trainer” means to you and your business; do you provide a program as a workout provider, or are you actually actively training people, providing feedback and coaching? 18:40 - Clifton did online training in 2012-2013, and started every client on the same 4 week program where the workouts were done live so he could see how the person moved before providing coaching and moving into the next phase of the training. 23:00 - Whether you’re doing online coaching, 1-on-1, small group, or large group training, you need to have a realistic expectation of deliverables. 25:35 - There are some Facebook groups that do reviews of the potentially shady social marketers claiming they can grow your following. 28:30 - People are so grateful for follow-up after a session. 30:10 - Go experience other facilities and other trainers and see how they do things, so you can generate ideas of what would be useful to apply to your own business. 32:13 - Set the expectation with your clients that you will be punctual, so you expect them to be too. 33:15 - Meet your client where they’re at in terms of communication; a millennial may prefer to text, but a client in their 70s may only want to use phone calls. 34:15 - Cliff predicts that after COVID, there is going to be a consolidation of who’s offering what; whatever businesses survive this are going to end up thriving. 35:20 - Convenience is the biggest factor in getting clients. 36:20 - Technology is catching up to allow virtual training to become so customized that it will begin to rival in-person training. 40:15 - Some trainers are even offering at-home gym designs, helping people build their own gym space. 41:05 - Instagram trainers give potential clients a false expectation. 42:00 - A lot of people who seem successful on Instagram actually aren’t, because they may have a lot of followers but they have very low engagement. 44:10 - Social media is saturated with trainers, and it’s likely time to start exploring other business models like a referral system. 46:00 - Decide if investing in Instagram is actually worthwhile to your business or if it is just going to feed your ego. 46:35 - Two examples of good Instagram use are John [last name?] and Kyle Dobbs because they both provide actionable, educational content. 48:23 - Think about the aspects of social media that you like, and start there with your content. 50:55 - PPSC is hoping to dominate the in-person education space. 51:35 - In 2021, they have an aggressive schedule of 10 events per month.   3 Key Points: New trainers should gain the broad experience of group fitness classes so that they can see a large volume of people. Don’t implicitly trust shiny Instagram business coaches and marketers; instead, experience other facilities and trainers firsthand to see what ideas it gives you. Drive your Instagram strategy from what you enjoy about social media.   Tweetable Quotes:  “If you are only doing 1-on-1s, that can be extraordinarily tiring. You’ve got to be the energy guy that brings them up the entire time, whereas with group, oftentimes the group can give you energy as the instructor and you feed off of it.” –Clifton Harski “The benefit for a lot of people with online training is that it’s lower cost for consumers. They pay less for it. But if you’re doing true coaching, it might cost you more of your time, which as a trainer means we should be charging even more.” –Clifton Harski “The #1 determiner of if someone signs up for you is convenience.” –Clifton Harski “Find the positives with the social media so that you can be consistent in your messaging, that you can help more people and the people will come to you.” –John Parker   Resources Mentioned:  James: Facebook Instagram Twitter John: Facebook Instagram Twitter Email: [email protected]  Website: www.vitalmetabolic.com  Pain-Free Performance Specialist Certification: Website Clifton Harski: Website Facebook Instagram Twitter  John Rusin: Instagram Kyle Dobbs: Instagram
  • Vital Metabolic: The Art and Science of Strength podcast

    Qigong Lady: The Art of Qi

    39:23

    On today’s episode of Vital Metabolic, hosts James Wheeler and John Parker speak with Natalia, known as the Qigong Lady. Hear about the benefits of a qigong practice, both on its own and as a complementary practice to other forms of fitness. Learn about how Natalia discovered qigong, why the practice isn’t for everyone, and how you can get started.   Episode Highlights:  1:49 - Natalia is originally from Russia and now lives in Abu Dhabi after traveling around quite a lot. 2:40 - Natalia began her qigong practice when she was living in Thailand. 3:06 - She was curious about tai-chi, energy practices, and spirituality, but she had trouble finding tai-chi classes and found qigong instead. 4:59 - With healing practices like qigong, it’s really about drawing energy into the body and controlling it, unlike strength and conditioning which is about the output of energy. 5:30 - Qigong is deeply spiritual and you aren’t going to build on your practice if you only focus on your body. 7:10 - Qigong is a broad practice that means working with energy, and there are different forms or branches that exist underneath it. Some can be considered martial arts, others healing practice, and more. 8:16 - Natalia practices medical qigong, in which the forms are very dynamic and are integrated into your body’s movements. 10:50 - Natalia uses qigong as her main fitness practice, but sometimes adds things like yoga practice; qigong complements every form. 13:00 - In group classes, Natalia teaches the form she studied the most, but if a private client comes to her with a specific issue, Natalia chooses the qigong forms that would be most beneficial. 15:16 - John has seen people doing qigong in the five minute breaks people take between weightlifting sets to balance their energy. 16:09 - Qigong allows you to choose what will work best for you each day. 17:46 - Each form of qigong uses a different style of breathing. 20:05 - Natalia combines individual and group classes, as well as workshops. 20:54 - She started with qigong somewhat later in life, as an adult, but she believes it came to her at exactly the right moment. 22:28 - She sees common injuries or conditions from people who come in for general qigong practice, including postural misalignments and other internal blockages. 23:01 - Everything in the body is connected, so an injury may not have originated in the spot where the pain is, but in a connected joint that isn’t as mobile as it should be. 24:00 - An injury means a blockage in energy or a break in the flow of your chi. 26:35 - Qigong has been growing because people are realizing they need to find alternative ways of finding flow and healing. 27:25 - People often have perceptions of tai-chi or qigong as being done by old people in a park, but having Natalia be a representative for it makes it more accessible. 28:00 - The pandemic has actually helped Natalia’s business because people suddenly had the time to dedicate to trainings and helped people realize they needed to focus more on their health. 30:53 - Natalia is a perfectionist and wanted to go as deep into qigong as she could as fast as she could, but she had to learn to be patient and listen to her body. 31:48 - It’s important not to practice to the point of fatigue every day or else you won’t have anything left for the next day. 33:15 - Natalia thinks the industry is doing well and wants it to reach more people, but qigong isn’t for everyone because it requires patience and dedication over a longer period of time. 34:00 - It’s about increasing the awareness about it and making it accessible to those who want to learn. 35:15 - Natalia’s practice looks different every day depending on how she feels, but the typical length of practice is 45 minutes to 1 hour. 36:26 - She ran online classes back in December but is running another series this month. 37:20 - She also offers a lot of free classes on the White Tiger Qigong Youtube channel.   3 Key Points: Qigong integrates a physical practice with a mental and spiritual practice. It is a broad term with many types of qigong practice, meaning it can complement any other fitness practice and can be adjusted to fit any person’s needs. Natalia hopes to make qigong practice more accessible and to spread awareness.   Tweetable Quotes:  “Everything happens because of the intention. Because of that deep, spiritual aspect of qigong. If you just do the form and you call it qigong but you focus only on the body, you won’t be building much of qi.” –Natalia “Qigong is very diverse. You are taught different things in different forms and different meditations. And on a daily basis you choose what works best for you.” –Natalia “In our culture, we think that more is better. Especially with exercise, people run themselves into the ground until they’re no longer physically able to do that... I tell my clients that we always leave the session with a half a tank of gas left.” –John Parker   Resources Mentioned:  James: Facebook Instagram Twitter John: Facebook Instagram Twitter Email: [email protected]  Website: www.vitalmetabolic.com  Natalia: Website Facebook Instagram  White Tiger Qigong: YouTube
  • Vital Metabolic: The Art and Science of Strength podcast

    Maverick: Field House Training

    53:08

    On today’s episode of Vital Metabolic, hosts James Wheeler and John Parker speak with Maverick of Field House. Learn about the Field House’s training philosophy, Maverick’s approaches to nutrition and recovery, and the importance of treating the people you train as students, not clients.   Episode Highlights:  03:25 - Maverick of Maverick’s Field House is a US Air Force veteran. The Field House has been open since 2014, and he is a Level 1 and Level 2 and is a Kettlebell Kings rep. 04:42 - Maverick thinks 2020 has exposed what the fitness world is likely to become and transitioned to Zoom immediately. 05:30 - They had been building their online presence for the past two years which really laid the foundation for pivoting to all-online classes during COVID. 07:55 - Maverick started working out in middle school after getting shoved into a wall and getting a concussion. 09:17 - He trains with people stronger than him as motivation so he never plateaus. 10:15 - His CrossFit coach was the one who suggested he start using kettlebells. 10:50 - What is the Beast Tamer challenge? 13:10 - The kettlebell community provides a lot of camaraderie and support. 15:35 - People need to get to the point where they know their number is good enough; the point should be a life of movement rather than being sedentary. 17:40 - Whatever you weigh, you should be able to move a certain percentage of your body weight, depending on your goals. 19:45 - Maverick has Field House specific benchmark goals for clients, including the Bodyweight Complex, 25 goblet squats at half your body weight in 1 minute, and 10 snatches on each side with half body weight. 22:46 - There are three factors of strength that are consistent with every sport: grip strength, leg strength, and core strength. 24:00 - Maverick doesn’t promote working out, he promotes training; it’s a different mindset. 26:00 - Your body doesn’t care how you move, just move well, move often, and move with intent. 28:19 - Think of the people you work with as students, not clients. 29:24 - For recovery, Maverick thinks of the seven P’s: Prior proper planning prevents piss poor performance. 29:45 - Maverick uses a WHOOP wearable. 30:50 - He uses a grafton tool for recovery while in the shower. 31:30 - Maverick also uses a Marc Pro. 32:05 - He recommends a CBD muscle rub before training. 32:50 - Maverick uses netcon supplements; make sure any supplement you take is as clean as possible, with all-natural ingredients and no synthetics. 35:29 - All of us can do anything we want to accomplish with just a little bit of drive. 37:20 - Maverick eats exclusively to perform, making sure he gets enough calories to train, about 100g of protein, and he trains within his means. 38:40 - After watching the documentary Gamechangers about eating a plant-based diet, Maverick decided to try it. He ended up eating around 100-150g of protein a day and didn’t lose any muscle mass or strength. 40:20 - Maverick has always done intermittent fasting and he thinks it’s the best thing you can do. 41:30 - Maverick doesn’t deprive himself, but advises you to understand the consequences of what you eat and accept them. If you go to New York and don’t eat a slice of pizza, you’re a fool. 43:45 - The core of Maverick’s diet is to eat nutrient-dense foods. 47:10 - Field House will be doing a single kettlebell training program for 5 weeks online. 47:47 - For any programs you sign up for, the videos get sent to you personally by Maverick in order to build a coach-student relationship. 48:15 - There is also a 5 week calibrated strength and conditioning program. 49:10 - They are launching a 3 day a week monthly subscription for people who only own one single kettlebell. 49:51 - Field House is also launching a live online class. 51:30 - Maverick will be writing a book about the philosophy of the Field House.   3 Key Points: Cultivate a life of movement and continuing education about fitness. Eat to perform, and train within your means to aid in recovery. The relationship between the trainer and student is important to prioritize.   Tweetable Quotes:  “If you’re trying to get strong, never lift with anybody who’s as strong as you. You’re only going to be as strong as the strongest person in the gym, and if that’s you, you’re gonna plateau.” –Maverick “We kind of get lost in the vision of what strength is supposed to be for every given person. I find that the universal definition of strength is that you should be able to look in the mirror, feel good about yourself, be a good husband or wife & be a useful person.” –Maverick “You just need to have enough calories in you to maintain the physique & structure you want. If you want to build lean muscle mass, do your data based on you because your DNA is different than anybody else in the world. What works for me is not going to work for you.” –Maverick   Resources Mentioned:  James: Facebook Instagram Twitter John: Facebook Instagram Twitter Email: [email protected]  Website: www.vitalmetabolic.com  Sponsor: Kettlebell Gains Apparel Sponsor: Great Lakes Giriya Sponsor: Vivo Barefoot Sponsor: Revive CBD Anti CBD muscle rub: https://iloveanti.com/product/anti-2000mg-cbd-muscle-rub/ Maverick’s Field House website: https://mavericksfieldhouse.com/ 
  • Vital Metabolic: The Art and Science of Strength podcast

    Jeremy Malecha: Data and Personalized Health

    53:25

    On today’s episode of Vital Metabolic, hosts James Wheeler and John Parker speak with Jeremy Malecha of Biocanic. They discuss the benefits and pitfalls of collecting health and fitness data, uses for wearable trackers, the future of this technology, and more. Listen to hear about Jeremy’s health journey and where his passion for data began.   Episode Highlights:  5:38 - Jeremy Malecha is the CEO and co-founder of Biocanic. 6:43 - Biocanic is a tool that James uses for his home coaching and personal training clients to help him design training plans. 7:13 - Jeremy got interested in data tracking and optimization as far back as childhood because he was fascinated by human performance. 9:20 - As he reached his mid-30s, he started noticing his own declining health including elevated blood sugar levels, chronic back pain, headaches, and low energy. 9:50 - Jeremy’s wife was training to be a functional diagnostic nutritionist and used him as a guinea pig. 10:37 - Jeremy used to be a runner but had to quit endurance workouts because of his back issues. 11:08 - He was stuck in trial and error trying to figure out what workouts, supplements, etc., would work best for him. 12:14 - Jeremy took the mediator release test, which tests for food sensitivities, found out he was sensitive to beef, cut it out, and lost 8% of his body fat in 30 days. 13:00 - The test takes multiple vials of blood and measures your immune and inflammatory response. 16:40 - Jeremy recommends starting with a food sensitivity test, especially for someone not working with a coach for personal guidance. 17:44 - He recommends doing this test even if you don’t think you’re experiencing any symptoms, because you could be unaware of sensitivities. 21:20 - Jeremy has also done hormone tests as a way of finding the cause for why he was resistant to weight gain and had high blood sugar. 23:06 - Cortisol levels are a great indicator of your overall health. 24:04 - Jeremy’s dutch test flagged high estrogen and issues with estrogen disposal, and was told to take dim as a supplement. 25:30 - Ultimately, dietary changes were more effective for Jeremy than supplements. 27:01 - Overall, Jeremy is primarily a carnivore with fatty fruits and some vegetables on weekends. 28:11 - Jeremy also took a microbiome test and had resistant h-pylori, c-diff, CIBO, low good gut flora, and other issues. 30:39 - John likes the data that comes from wearables but worries about people becoming orthorexic. 31:09 - Jeremy likes the Ora ring and notes that people need to be wary of wearables’ ability to detect sleep stages accurately.  34:55 - The use for wearables for data tracking is to see if something has caused a dramatic shift in your normal rather than honing in obsessively on small details. 37:07 - Jeremy thinks the technology for wearables will continue to improve and get more accurate over time. 38:27 - A company is developing a smart toilet that can run daily urinalysis and microbiome analysis. 40:17 - Jeremy hopes that where this is headed is the accessibility of this data to the mass population to help inform dietary and health decisions. 41:20 - Biocanic is useful for monitoring lab tests, programs, supplements, and more, and lets you add your data from wearables. 42:19 - Integrative and functional approaches have overlap and seem similar but are different and personalized. 43:12 - Wearables give you accountability. 46:49 - Intake assessments should be shorter and easier to do, both for the client and the practitioner. 48:20 - Biocanic is now trying to solve more and more pain points for its users. 48:50 - Biocanic is also trying to compare and overlay data from multiple sources to find more correlations people might otherwise not detect.   3 Key Points: Health and fitness data helps to tailor treatments and dietary plans to your specific needs. Wearable technology provides accountability to those trying to stick to health plans. Collecting health data is empowering more and more people to take control of their wellness.   Tweetable Quotes:  “I was trying to figure out what would get to my personal body composition and strength goals. It was never really effective because it was never coherent. It was that cycle of trial and error that everybody gets caught into.” –Jeremy Malecha “If you don’t test, you’re just guessing, you might think you’re fine with certain foods—’Oh, I feel fine’—but you really don’t know what your optimal is.” –James Wheeler “How do people actually get to that point where they understand that there is a difference in how much you pay for food and how it affects you, your behavior, and your overall health.” –Jeremy Malecha   Resources Mentioned:  James: Facebook Instagram Twitter John: Facebook Instagram Twitter Email: [email protected]  Sponsor: Kettlebell Gains Apparel Sponsor: Great Lakes Giriya Sponsor: Vivo Barefoot Sponsor: Revive CBD Biocanic: Website Instagram Facebook Mediator Release Test FDN Conference
  • Vital Metabolic: The Art and Science of Strength podcast

    The Big Three

    48:20

    On today’s episode of Vital Metabolic, hosts James Wheeler and John Parker break down the “big three” in powerlifting: The benchpress, back squat, and deadlift. Learn about variations you can do to accommodate your personal strengths or injuries and the key movements you should master.   Episode Highlights:  1:10 - The Big Three in powerlifting are the three main lifts judged in a meet. 1:29 - The three main lifts are the back squat, deadlift, and benchpress.  3:20 - What these movements have in common is compound movements, using multiple joints. 4:55 - Strength training should fit the person; no one movement is good or bad. 5:45 - Lifting is a great way to measure how strong you are getting over time. 6:25 - You need to take a lot of things into consideration to make sure you have good form when bench pressing to avoid injury.  7:28 - Genetically, some people are going to be better at certain movements than others.  8:45 - Variations to help ease shoulder injuries include doing a dumbbell bench press, including a foam roller bolster to help give you better range of motion, or pressing down to a small degree. 10:10 - The “landline” press is an alternative if bench pressing is painful. 10:30 - It’s important to develop the horizontal movement pattern necessary for bench pressing, and you can do this simply by training with push-ups. 12:10 - Another option is the cable pulley press, which gives you an integration from your toes to your fingers, with the whole central nervous system working together. 15:23 - These variations that change the angle of the press is important for maintaining shoulder health. 18:08 - The back squat is the “undisputed champion” of lower body training. 18:23 - The motion of a back squat is similar to jumping. 18:45 - The back squat is one of the most complex movements and it is overused. 19:45 - James would give a back squat to advanced athletes who are looking to build mass, but their end goal should be the starting point for how and why they do back squats. 20:12 - There are a lot of variables to how each individual does a back squat. 20:45 - James looks at a new client’s crawling pattern for coordination, their jump for power, whether they can do a pull-up for overall strength, how long they can do a passive hang from a bar to test grip, and some squatting to test mobility. 23:25 - James gives a box squat to a client who’s 6’6” to provide additional stability.  24:40 - Leverage the eccentrics in your back squat; lighten the weight you’re lifting and focus on the tension in your lower body to work the muscle while keeping yourself safe. 26:20 - You’re the strongest isometrically, second strongest eccentrically, and third strongest concentrically. 26:55 - The barbell front squat takes some of the load off the spine and shifts it to the quads, and builds the anterior core strength. 28:10 - James sometimes uses wrist straps to help in front squat deadlifts for those with limited wrist extension. 31:10 - Low bar back squats have become popular because of power lifting as a sport. 32:05 - James is more of a high bar back squatter, but John prefers low bar; it depends on whether you are more hip dominant or more quad dominant. 35:20 - The hip hinge is the most important movement in training because it opens up the options for you once you master it. 36:15 - James will start a beginner with hip bridges on a bench so they can start to feel their hamstrings and glutes work. 40:10 - John’s main exercise for hip hinging is the single leg deadlift. 40:38 - The single leg deadlift allows your center of gravity to stay in line as opposed to you having to navigate around your knees, which can cause lower back issues. 41:57 - John took a year break from deadlifts and only did kettlebell swings. 42:29 - Don’t be afraid to take a break, especially if you’re developing overuse injuries. 42:55 - James suggests varying your workout with kettlebell front squats or heavy dumbbell front squats. 43:16 - 25 reps with half your body weight is a huge feat of strength for the average person and it’s a good test. 43:44 - The point is to do functional movement patterns that suit your body and fitness level. 46:32 - A key benefit of powerlifting is learning how to lift appropriately.   3 Key Points: Every exercise you do should ideally be tailored to your body in order to maximize its benefit. Consider your end goal when determining what exercises to focus on in your training. Variation in your exercise routine is key for avoiding overuse injuries.   Tweetable Quotes:  “Changing the angle of presses is vital for shoulder health.” –James Wheeler “The back squat. I think it’s kind of the undisputed champion of lower body training.” –John Parker “As we start to get older, we need to figure out what’s the endgame, what’s the reward, what’s the risk?” –John Parker “There’s a difference between competing and health. If you’re competing in a sport, you have to benchpress, you have to back squat, you have to deadlift, because that’s a portion of your sport.” –James Wheeler   Resources Mentioned:  James: Facebook Instagram Twitter John: Facebook Instagram Twitter Email: [email protected]  Sponsor: Kettlebell Gains Apparel Sponsor: Great Lakes Giriya Sponsor: Vivo Barefoot Sponsor: Revive CBD

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